Menu

The Bible

Mark Zaveson sent me an e-mail this week that centered on a discussion concerning the Bible and the accuracy of the scriptures. The author’s intent was to review and promote a book whose author attacked the common historical revisionism that is around concerning Jesus specifically and the Bible in general.
continue reading

A Brief History of Christmas

By John Steele Gordon Christmas famously "comes but once a year." In fact, however, it comes twice. The Christmas of the Nativity, the manger and Christ child, the wise men and the star of Bethlehem, "Silent Night" and "Hark the Herald Angels Sing" is one holiday. The Christmas of parties, Santa Claus, evergreens, presents, "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" and "Jingle Bells" is quite another.
continue reading

The Plural God in Genesis

I found this in J. W. McGarvey’s compiled writings volume titled Biblical Criticism. As McGarvey was a considered scholar in both the Hebrew and Greek, I thought it might be useful to note his remarks concerning the use of plural pronouns in the Hebrew language. The response was posted to a radical question concerning disputing the authorship of Moses for the Penteteuch; however, the answer is interesting on other levels as well.
continue reading

Mayor Guiliani and The Bible as the Word of God

In the Republican presidential debate on Wedneday, November 28, a person asked the candidates if they believe in every word of the Bible. Guiliani responded, "The reality is: I believe it, but I don't believe it necessarily literally true in every single respect. I think there are parts of the Bible that are interpretive. I think there are parts of the Bible that are allegorical. I think there are parts of the Bible that are meant to be interpreted in…

continue reading

Bible Literacy (2)

A part of American history had its start with the effects of the Protestant Revolution and also the emergence of the Puritans in 16th-century Britain. As with most denominations, the Bible was the backbone of Puritanism. Mr. Gelernter continued, “It was also central to the emergence of modern Britain in the 16th and 17th centuries--and modern Britain was central in turn to the establishment of the United States of America and in an only slightly lesser sense to the continued development of the whole world.”
continue reading

The Grave Danger Found in Thinking Too Hard

I am amused by some of my Christian acquaintances and friends. They spend time postulating and posing ideas in their minds as to what exactly is meant by some of the weightier things in God’s word. The church and the form it takes is one current fashion. I read recently that the church is “invisible.” I have heard that it is not an organization, a corporation, an entity, or an institution.
continue reading

Bible Literacy

A report released in 2005 by an organization called the Bible Literacy Project suggested that young Americans know very little about the Bible. That probably did not come as much of a shock. And while the report has importance, but then first things first, another fair number of Americans do not see why teenagers need to know anything at all about the Bible. And some of these same people may profess to be Christians.
continue reading

Evolution Is Not Based on Natural Laws

Duane Gish, Ph.D. One of the claims most frequently used by evolutionists for excluding the scientific evidence for creation in public schools and to be denied for publication in scientific journals is that such evidence is not based on natural laws, therefore it cannot be scientific. They claim that evolutionary theory is based on natural laws and thus qualifies as a scientific theory. Hence, the theory of creation must be excluded, but the theory of evolution is admissible (of course, it must be absolutely atheistic). However, evolutionary theory is not based on natural laws but is actually contrary to natural laws.
continue reading

A short and partial history of the wall of separation of church and state in the US

The current judicial exercise in ensuring a hard separation between religion and the federal or state governments has a fairly short history. It really dates to the last century when Justice Hugo Black resurrected a comment that Thomas Jefferson had made in reply to a letter from the Danbury Baptist Association. The Connecticut group had written to congratulate him upon his election to the Presidency in 1804. His use of the phrase “a wall of separation” is its first occurrence in text in this land, and in its context it was used as part of his explanation as to why he had chosen not to call for a national day of fasting and thanksgiving as his two predecessors had done upon election. Justice Black’s appropriation of the remark was much more insidious.
continue reading