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Revelation: Two Theories (Part 4)

4 The general statements of some historical records are considered to support a late date (96 AD) rather than one prior to 70 AD. However, the testimony of history rests solely upon a single account: A short statement from Irenaeus. His record is the only historical argument for the late date; and without it there simply is no historical platform for a late date argument. Irenaeus wrote near the end of the second century. In his fifth treatise against Gnosticism…

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Revelation: Two Theories (Part 3 Concluded)

There are no known records of persecutions of Christians dating from the 1st century in the annals of Rome aside from those attributed to Nero. Tacitus wrote his History of Rome 50 years beyond Nero’s reign, and his is the sole complete historical source from near to that time. He recorded from Octavian through Nero and included the persecutions of Nero. He mentions that he had access to the records, or that the information had been directly told him by witnesses…

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Revelation: Two Theories… (Part 2 and 3)

2 Some commentators (including the late Homer Hailey and earlier, B. W. Johnson) wrote that a decade of false teaching (or a generation as Johnson supposed), would be needed to lead a church into error. This they list as part of their support for a late first century date. Both state that with an early date, that there was not sufficient time from the time these churches had been founded to corrupt their doctrine. This logic opposes itself. It is…

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Revelation: Two Theories on the Date

There are two principal theories concerning when the Revelation was written. I will note right away (as others have), that the matter will never be settled to everyone’s satisfaction. So, pick one or none. That does not mean that I have wasted my time by defining a crystal-clear argument for accepting the early date. This is thoroughly vetted and footnoted and I have read every source. The time spent reading and documenting the emperors of Rome was paramount in my…

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Revelation: The Severans to the Constantines

Lucius Septimius Severus, was appointed Caesar following the brief reigns of Pertinax, Julianus, and Clodius Albinus all of whom he had a hand in dispatching. Severus was Caesar from 192 to 211. Edward Gibbon credits Severus as the first of the emperors of the decline of the Roman Empire. However, we should pause to note the timeline is now nearly 200 years beyond the resurrection of Christ. Severus had been appointed by the Praetorian Guard and would later be assassinated…

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Rome: Domitian, the Flavians and Antonine Emperors

Titus had been a steadying force but was followed on the throne by his brother Domitian who ruled from 81 to 96. Domitian was an egotist of similar stripe to Nero, and as his father Vespasian was now dead, when the youngest Flavian acceded to the throne - there was no force for restraint. Some historians state that the persecution of Christians expanded dramatically during his reign. However, noting that he maintained debaucheries, there is no historical record for persecutions…

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Revelation: Nero

Nero is the most readily recognized of all the emperors of Rome, except (possibly) for Julius Caesar. He reigned from 54 until his suicide in 68 and was the last of the Julian line. Though not mentioned by name in any of the ancient biblical manuscripts, it was undoubtedly to Nero that Paul had appealed as recorded in Acts. It was noted by the historian Seutonius that to deflect suspicion from himself as the starter of the great fire that…

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Revelation: The Claudians

Octavian was succeeded by Tiberius Claudius Nero (court name indicating his status as a god: Tiberius Caesar Divi Augusti Filius). He was legally granted to be Octavian’s adopted son, and was also the secret lover of Octavian’s consort Livia. Tiberius reigned from 17 to 37. Tiberius was Caesar during the beginning of the Church of Christ (Luke 3:1). He too assumed the title Augustus. He had no care for any religions beyond the Roman Pantheon and emperor worship; and he…

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Revelation: The Empire Begins

This historical section is offered to allow those who have little knowledge of this to be better able to understand the tenor of the times in which the final book in the scriptures was written and how the early history of Rome fits seamlessly within it. I consider it to be of critical value to identifying the signs in Revelation. The Julian's The first titled emperor of Rome was Gaius Julius Caesar, who reigned from BC 48 up to his…

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Revelation: Rome Begins With Caesar

Julius Caesar was a unique individual in many respects. He had been delivered in the first of what quickly became known as a Caesarian Section; and he, while still a child, wrote of his visions and dreams of leading Rome. As a young man he recorded his conquests in Germania from his early days as Tribune in charge of the Northern legions. He was intelligent, uncommon and unusual and thereby made many enemies. In BC 49 Julius Caesar with his…

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